Vitamin D is Critical to Prevent Dementia and Alzheimer’s

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A study is published in the August 6, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggested that older people that do not get enough vitamin D may increase their risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.  1

The study examined 1,658 dementia-free people over the age of 65.  For an average of six years, the results indicated the following:

  • 171 people developed dementia
  • 102 people developed Alzheimer’s

Vitamin D levels of all the participants were tested and the risks of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s were determined in participants that had:

  • deficient levels, and
  • severely deficient levels

Following are the results:

Dementia

  • Participants with deficient levels of Vitamin D had a 53% increased risk of developing dementia
  • Participants with severely deficient levels of Vitamin D had a 125% increased risk of developing dementia

Alzheimer’s

  • Participants with deficient levels of Vitamin D had a 70% increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s
  • Participants with severely deficient levels of Vitamin D had a 120% increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s

The blood test that measures vitamin D is called a Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood test. The results of this blood test can tell you whether you’re getting too little, too much or the right amount of vitamin D.

According to the Neurology® study, the authors defined (25(OH)D) blood levels as follows:

  • Severely 25(OH)D deficient       <25 nmol/L
  • Deficient 25(OH)D                      25 to <50 nmol/L
  • Sufficient concentrations            50 nmol/L

Informational References:

Vitamin D Council

Vitamin D Council – Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood test

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood test (lab Test Online)


Resources:

Life Extension – Vitamin D