C-reactive protein (CRP): Effects and Natural Substances that May Lower CRP

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C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body. It is one of a group of proteins called “acute phase reactants” that go up in response to inflammation.

A high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) test, which is more sensitive than a standard test, also can be used to evaluate your risk of developing coronary artery disease.

High levels of CRP are associated with a higher risk of cognitive decline in comparison to lower levels. [1]  

Table:  Effects of C-reactive protein (CRP)

C-Reactive Protein

 

 

Cause

Effect

Reference(s)

Alzheimer’s

 

 

 

The brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients contain higher than normal levels of C-Reactive Protein.

  [2]

Multiple-Infarct Dementia

 

 

 

The brains of multiple-Infarct dementia patients contain higher than normal levels of C-Reactive Protein.

  [3]   [4]

 

Table:  Nootropics/Nutraceuticals/Foods/Herbs that may Lower C-Reactive Protein*

C-Reactive Protein

 

 

Category

Nootropics/Nutraceuticals/Foods/Herbs

Reference(s)

Amino Acids

 

 

 

Arginine

  [5]

Carotenoids

 

 

 

Astaxanthin

  [6]

Enzymes

 

 

 

Proteolytic enzymes

  [7]

Foods

 

 

 

Cacao

  [8]

Herbs

 

 

 

Green Tea

  [9]

 

Golden Root

  [10]

 

Nettle

  [11]

 

Red Clover

  [12]

Hormones

 

 

 

DHEA

  [13]

Lipids

 

 

 

Alpha-Linolenic Acid

  [14]

 

EPA

  [15]

Minerals

 

 

 

Magnesium

  [16]   [17]

 

Selenium

  [18]

Polyphenols

 

 

 

Curcumin

  [19]

 

Kaempferol

  [20]

 

Malvidin

  [21]

 

Quercetin

  [22]

 

Resveratrol

  [23]

Probiotics

 

 

 

Lactobacillus rhamnosus

  [24]

Vitamins

 

 

 

Folic Acid

  [25]

 

Vitamin B6

  [26]

 

Vitamin C

  [27]

 

Vitamin D

  [28]   [29]

 

Vitamin E

  [30]

*Note:  The contents of this document have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Any substances referred to in this document are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information and statements made are for education purposes and are not intended to replace the advice of your treating doctor. BioFoundations does not dispense medical advice, prescribe, or diagnose illness. If you have a severe medical condition or health concern, consult your physician.


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References:

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